note: this is a "cobwebsite"

for full disclaimer, crick here


E. Bear's Home Page

Where Am I?       You are here.


Brog


Subjects:

Art -- (I know something about art but I don't know what I like)

Health -- (Health Care can be hazardous to your health)

seafood for omega 3 (and low mercury)
seafood for omega 3 (and low mercury)

Philosophy -- (Why do we do what we do?)

Politics -- (Who do you think you are?)

Drug Education -- (Why do we do things that stupid?)

Science and Computer Lab -- (Mad Science, Gizmology, Mackery)

Metal Shop -- (Low-Tech Stuff, 1924 vintage)

Home Economics -- (Cooking, Gardening, Domestic Animals)

Recess -- (Fun and Games, and "none of the above")

History -- (some Northern New Mexico, some techno)

Social Studies -- (Reference materials)

Study Hall & Library -- (Reference materials)

Music -- (hath charmth to thoothe the thavage beatht)

Religion -- (Your karma ran over my dogma)

Sports -- (Atlanta Braves? When did they leave Boston?)

English -- (The language with the most mojo, and the most chaotic)

Detention -- (stay after class and clean the erasers, or vice versa)

Extra-Curricular Activities -- (and maybe a kick in the virtual reality data pants).


 

Art:

( ! )

Artsyness: "Nerd Defending a Starr case" by Pablum Picasso

See also The Museum of Taste


 

Health:

(the soap opera we're all caught up in)

Harris Coulter tells us to beware of vaccines, particularly DPT. Food for thought.
Check out the Center for Empirical Medicine.

More food for thought: I have heard it alleged that AIDS came from a bad batch of polio vaccine.

And in an unrelated episode of this soap opera, some basic advice:
eat good stuff like rye, oats, olive oil, green things (including arugula).
Pesto is a good way to get your veggies; we do lots of it at my house.

And of course eating your veggies is a good way to maintain the health of your colon.
Click here to read more about that. Click here to read about your semicolon.

Just what are you eating anyway? Read the label.
If it says monosodium glutamate, consider not eating it.
MSG, as it's also called, is not food. Too much of it is poison.
For some people, any at all is poison.

The Four Food Groups of Hacking:
Caffeine Nicotine
Sugar Grease

 

Philosophy:

(What is the sound of one clam hopping?)



Non-Trivial Quotes

What is stability these days? Having a permanent e-mail address? Food for thought.

Motto of the week: "VENI VIDI VELCRO"
"I came, I saw, I stuck around"

Drop me a line at presto@roastbusters.org with your ideas for this section.

Meanwhile, here's one: Mañana (or Manana if your browser
makes different assumptions about character sets) --
it doesn't mean "tomorrow"; it means "not today".

Food for thought: a list of ponderables


 

Politics

(What is the point of one clammy handshake?)

Stolen from Jim Hightower's "Hightower Lowdown":





 

Drug Education:

(What is the sound of one gram popping?)



Position paper on the fiasco of drug education

and more discussion on the subject on the main(line) drug page

And a review by Roger Ebert of a movie about the drug business --
here's the header and first paragraph:

TRAFFIC / **** (R)

January 5, 2001

Robert Wakefield: Michael Douglas
Javier Rodriguez: Benicio Del Toro
Montel Gordon: Don Cheadle
Ray Castro: Luis Guzman
Caroline Wakefield: Erika Christensen
Arnie Metzger: Dennis Quaid
Helena Ayala: Catherine Zeta-Jones

USA Films presents a film directed by Steven Soderbergh. Written by Stephen
Gaghan. Running time: 147 minutes. Rated R (for pervasive drug content, strong
language, scenes of violence and sexuality).

BY ROGER EBERT

Our laws against illegal drugs function as a price support system for the criminal drug industry. They do not stop drugs. Despite billions of dollars spent and a toll of death, addiction, crime, corruption and lives wasted in prison, it is possible today for anyone who wants drugs to get them. "For someone my age," says a high school student in the new film "Traffic," "it's a lot easier to get drugs than it is to get alcohol." ...


The whole review is at http://www.suntimes.com/ebert/ebert_reviews/2001/01/010501.html


Science and Computer Lab:

(Live better electrically)



Repairing Power Packs for StyleWriters (original and Portable)

Confused about the names people use for their PowerBooks?
Names that don't appear on them anywhere? Help is on the way: PowerBook Names

A few words about oil

A curious page about combination invention ideas

A whole page about Color Codes

I'm not sure where this one goes, but what the heck, try it here:
Gizmology for the Road Worrier

Math as Art: the Mandelbrot Set.

A few words about attachments.

Label city: affixing and removing labels.

Geek city: the vi command summary.

If you're having trouble connecting with your new whizbang
superfast modem, maybe you have a crappy phone line.
Might work at 9600 bps. Here is a minimal compendium of
modem init strings to force modems to 9600.

If you can't get anything at all out of the modem, maybe this crib sheet will help:
Mac Modem Cable Pinouts

If that doesn't help, maybe it's dead.
Do you have lightning and surge protection on the power line AND the phone line?

Both Mad Science and Gizmology require parts.
Here's an old list of parts vendors.
(Maybe it should be in the History listings since it's so old.)

I still have the all-time favorite, the List of All Known Coaxial Cables
-- all the RG cables anyway.


Save the Wild Eep!!

Apple done left it out of OS 9. Get it here.




New gizmo: check FedEx tracking info without having to go to their site first and load their main page -- download this little page and run it locally on your machine: FedEx Tracker
Netscape users on a Mac: option-click on the link to save it directly to your hard disk, or hold down the button on the link to get the popup menu and save it from there. Or you can actually load the page and do a Save As... and select "Source" from the menu popup button that probably starts out saying "Text".  

Metal Shop:

(Short sleeve shirts and bow ties only, please)

Various items from "Machinery's Handbook", 1924 edition:
Heat Treatment of Steel
Bursting and Working Pressures of Steel Pipe
Standard Wire Nails and Spikes


 

Home Economics:

(It's not just for sissies any more)

I don't know if this goes here, but anyway it's Mr. Nice Guy's Divorce
Cider Vinegar and other remedies
Making Jelly
How to Cook Posole
Animals
Mulching with Rocks
Gardening
Get Organized Already

New Recipe -- Meatish Sweetballs (no meat)


 

Recess:

(No smoking on the playground!)

I know this is what you've all been waiting for:
Bumper Stickers (or Glare Guard Stickers) for the Net
... but maybe not. Maybe it was Bricks Tricks.
How about Trivia questions and/or Riddles?
Would you believe X, the Unknown?
Hangin' out wit' da boys.

Good Game for Holiday Parties -- Chinese Gift Exchange




 

History:

(History is bunk! --Henry Ford)

The main history page

Photos of the church collapse in Lemitar, New Mexico

Techno history: stories of some standards processes: Standards Soap Operas.


 

Social Studies:

(History is written by an infinite number of monkeys ... )



History is actually written by hacks and flacks at the various P.R. houses. Who do you think invented the term "ethnic cleansing"? A New York P.R. outfit working for the KLA., that's who.

Who was inside the barbed wire at the Trnpolje refugee camp? Not Fikrit Alic. He was outside, and he had his shirt off like the rest of the guys because it was very hot. And he looks like he does because he had survived tuberculosis.

The ITN television crew was inside the barbed wire, doing yellow journalism at its absolute worst. Somebody who had gone into the camp spotted Fikrit, and shoved him up to the front. The ITN camera zoomed in on him, and presto! the new poster boy; the carefully cropped picture was bandied about all over the world. Almost everybody got sucked in -- even the Inkatha Freedom Party in South Africa

Thomas Deichmann was trying not to get sucked in when his wife noticed that the barbed wire was on the wrong side of the posts. Deichmann published an article exposing the fraud, and ITN sued for libel. They won, for two reasons:

In general, you might want to scope out "A People's History of the United States of America" by Howard Zinn. I have yet to read it myself so I haven't put it on the Books page, but real soon now ...




 

Study Hall & Library:

(Please do not use chewing gum for bookmarks!)

Reference section:
Books you ought to be aware of. Check it out. Good stuff.
Lists and literature Listservs, magazines, etc.
Dictionary of Modern Office Terminology.


 

Music:

(Please confine gum chewing to loud passages)

Frank Zappa -- a cool guy.
Brian Eno and David Byrne
Random Elvis Links
Words to "The Asteroid Light" (to the tune of "The Eddystone Light")


 

Religion:

(Please do not put chewing gum under the pews)

Visitors' Guide
St. Jude -- another cool guy.
Semi-non-offensive religious jokes
Medjugorje Miscellany
The Religion Page



 

Sports:

(Please do not put chewing gum under the bleachers)

I've finally come up with something to put here.
I started playing racquetball.
It has all you need in a great game:
Easy to grasp, difficult to master.
You can find out lots about it at the
US Racquetball Association web site (www.usra.org).


 

English:

(The language held together by chewing gum)

Ever wonder why English spelling is so chaotic?
The credit goes to William Caxton, the first English printer.
He didn't have a feel for it, so he would ask other people --
different people every time, as you can tell from the result.
So you should feel free to make up your own spellings as you go along, OK?
In the midst of such chaos, anarchy is consummate sanity.
Pardon my sloganeering.

There is something you can do. Join the Punctuation Liberation Front

And you might consider matters of Style worth pondering.

Fents

Here's some poetry for you to depreciate and some other oddities:



 

Detention:

(Chewing gum as a lifestyle)

My PGP public key is here in the cloak room,
and my Disclaimer is over there in the pocket of my trench coat.

The Sayings of Chairman W




 

Extra-Curricular Activities and Miscellany:

(Stupid Pet Tricks would be here if I knew any)




Good Teeth




The Museum of Taste




Garlic




Various ham radio stuff




Useless Information




New Calendar for Y2K






That address once again: ebear@newmex.com